Train Derailment

Bridgewater Bulletin, October 4, 1904.

Just after the train from Middleton left the Northfield Station on Saturday night , the rear coach left the track and pounded over the ties for about three car lengths before the train could be stopped. Great excitement prevailed in the derailed car which keeled over slightly and contained a number of passengers among whom were many women and children. A man named Simeon Shay, of Hamilton, Ontario, jumped from the car and alighted in some stones and stumps and sustained a compound fracture of his left ankle. The derailed car was detached from the train, which proceeded to this place with all speed. The wounded man, who was suffering terribly, was removed to the office of Drs. Stewart and Kelley, who set and dressed the ankle after which the sufferer was taken to Clark’s Hotel and made as comfortable as circumstances would permit.

Shay is in the employ of the Wrought Iron Range Company of Toronto, and was coming here to work when he met with the accident. The poor fellow is away from friends and has no accident insurance, therefore any kindness shown him will be very welcome. He will likely be sent to the Victoria General Hospital as soon as he can be moved. The cause of the accident is not yet known. On Sunday an examination was made and the derailed car placed on the track and brought to the shops. It is not damaged to any great extent and the wheels, which are of the best made with steel bands are in good condition.

Contributor: Rosemary Rafuse

Dr. Faulkner

Bridgewater Bulletin, October 4, 1904.

A large and representative number of the medical men of Lunenburg County, together with a few professional and business friends, gave a farewell dinner at Hotel Miller, Lunenburg, on the night of the 27th inst, in honour of Dr. Faulkner of Mahone. The doctor is about leaving the scene of his labours for the purpose of prosecuting his studies in the hospitals of London and Edinburgh. The occasion was a most enjoyable one, thanks to the efforts of the genial host; and though akin to sad such partings always are, this fact did not materially interfere with the appetites of those present. If good wishes and kindly impressions are helpful and tend to stimulate endeavor, Dr. Faulkner goes to the Old Country with no mean supply. After dinner the guests of the evening and all retired to the residence of Dr. Burrell, where, with music, and laughter, accompainments of good fellowship, a most memorable function was concluded. Dr .Faulkner is a young physician, who had an enviable student career, and during the few years of his practice in Lunenburg County, has given evidence of professional qualifications of the highest order. His genial disposition, fine literary taste and honest manliness, have endeared him to his most intimate acquaintances, and made his esteemed by all. He will be much missed by his medical brethren, patrons, and the whole community, which cannot help feeling the absence of a gentleman of his attainments. All will find consolation in the fact that he will, by his present course, prepare himself for greater achievement and wider usefulness, Bon Voyage, Friend Faulkner.

Contributor: Rosemary Rafuse