GALLANT RESCUE AT MAHONE BAY

Bridgewater Bulletin, March 30, 1920.

A deed worthy of recognition by the Humane Society was enacted here Saturday, while several persons were enjoying themselves ice boating on the harbour. Guy Joudrey, of Mader’s Cove, being unaware of the weakness of the ice on the inner edge, was seen by Murray Ernst approaching, what he, Ernst, knew to be a dangerous locality, a few hundred feet off Ernst’s shipyard. He gave chase to Joudrey, shouting and gesticulating, but Joudrey, being of the opinion that a race was on, kept to his course. The shoutings of the shipyard men tended to excite him, and a few seconds later his boat went through, precipitating him into the icy waters.

Ernst arrived a few seconds later, tacked his boat, lowered the sail, and unreafing his halyards, threw the line to Joudrey, whose struggles to get out, caused the ice to continually break under him. The shipyard men endeavored to reach him with planks, but failing, owing to their heavy weight, secured a dory and pushing it ahead of them succeded in effecting a rescue, but none too soon, for with a firm grip of the line, he had lapsed into unconsciousness. He was taken into Ernst’ s store, restoratives used and ultimately brought around. His legs and face were cut by coming in contact with the sharp edges of the ice. Had it not been for Ernst’s presence of mind and quick action, Joudrey would have drowned before aid would have reached him from shore. He was in an extremely dangerous position himself but being light in weight and clear headed he successfully saved a valued life. He is a son of Willis A. Ernst, of Ernst’s Ltd. Both boys are twenty years of age.

Contributor: Rosemary Rafuse

Contributor: Rosemary Rafuse

The Storm

Bridgewater Bulletin, Mar. 16, 1920

Rain and Wind Has Caused Destructive Floods All Over the Country

A violent rain and wind storm on Saturday has swollen the various rivers and other streams to such an extent that a vast amount of desctruction has resulted.

Torrents of water came down from the water-sheds of the LaHave tearing away and destroying everything in the path and raising the tide in the river to an unprecedented height and breaking the ice into huge cakes which thundered and smashed in their course until they piled up off the works of the Acadia Gas Engine Co., and now threaten the foundations of wharves and piling there.

IIn their mad course the sluiceways and booms of the Davison Lumber and Manufacturing Co., were torn away and raced down the river. Parts of the upper mill and the tramway bridge there were wrecked and carried away causing thousands of dollars damage. It will take twenty tons of boom chains to replace those lost and it will be months before the damage to dams and mills can be repaired to put them in working condition. A large number of logs including almost all the winter’s cut of Wynn Crouse have been swept down the river with little hope of any being recovered. All sorts of debris, including two dead hogs and parts of small buildings floated down with the flood.

A large number of logs including almost all the winter’s cut of Wynn Crouse have been swept down the river with little hope of any being recovered. All sorts of debris, including two dead hogs and parts of small buildings floated down with the flood.

The railway also has its troubles. Serious washouts near Riversdale and Nictaux prevented the operation of trains to Middleton while the Caledonia branch line held up by floods at Pleasant River and other places. The main line from Halifax to Yarmouth is intact. The railway men hope to have all trains running by Wednesday night.

The Annapolis Valley is flooded so that all trains are cancelled and much of the country is under water. Barns have been demolished, cattle drowned and people forced from their houses.

In many other parts of the province the water rose to great heights and caused great damage.

Contributor: Rosemary Rafuse